Nebraska History Table of Contents, 1885  to present. Below are links to recent article excerpts, and to full-text PDFs of many other articles.

Use the “Find” window to search for specific words (press Ctrl-F if you don’t see it).

 

 

First

Name

Last

Name

Suffix

Role

Title

Remarks

Pub

Vol

Issue

Year

1st

Page

Last

Page

David

Bristow

 

Author

Introduction

 

See Excerpts from this Issue

Special Issue: After the Indian Wars: People, Places, and Episodes Featuring papers from the Ninth Fort Robinson History Conference, April 25-27, 2013

NH

95

01

2014

02

03

Paul L

Hedren

 

Author

Fort Robinson, Custer, and the Legacy of the Great Sioux War

 

See Excerpts from this Issue

 

NH

95

01

2014

04

13

Thomas R

Buecker

 

Author

“Pretty Well Fixed for Defense”: Enclosed Army Posts in the Northern Plains, 1819-1872

 

See Excerpts from this Issue

 

NH

95

01

2014

14

27

Brian G

Shellum

 

Author

Charles Young and the Buffalo Soldiers after the Indian Wars

 

See Excerpts from this Issue

 

NH

95

01

2014

28

35

Brian

Dippie

 

Author

The Changing Image of George Armstrong Custer

 

See Excerpts from this Issue

 

NH

95

01

2014

36

51

Jerome A

Greene

 

Author

On the Brink: The Pre-Wounded Knee Army Deployment of 1890

 

See Excerpts from this Issue

 

NH

95

01

2014

52

63

Thomas

Powers

 

Author

The Crazy Horse Medicine Bundle

 

See Excerpts from this Issue

 

NH

95

01

2014

64

75

 

 

 

 

Postscript: Fort Robinson 1875

 

See Excerpts from this Issue

 

NH

95

01

2014

76

76

Thomas R

Buecker

 

Author

The Father of Lincoln, Nebraska: The Life and Times of Thomas P Kennard

During his lifetime Kennard was widely known as the ”Father of Lincoln,” and he had a strong claim to the title. He was part of the three-man commission that selected the tiny village of Lancaster as the new state capital, and he exercised a broad influence in both politics and business.

NH

95

02

2014

78

93

John

Ludwickson

 

Author

The Death and Burial of Big Elk, the Great Omaha Chief

The year of Big Elk’s death has long been misreported. New research not only corrects the date, but also provides new details about the circumstances surrounding the powerful chief’s death and burial at Bellevue in 1848.

NH

95

02

2014

94

99

Dan

Jibreus

 

Author

The Long Journey of White Fox

Traveling with two Swedish entrepreneurs, in 1874 three Pawnee men from Nebraska became the first Native Americans to tour Scandinavia, performing native dances and customs for the public. One of the three, White Fox, died in Sweden, where a scientist claimed his body and had his head and torso taxidermied and mounted. The author follows the story from the arrival of the Swedish men in the United States to the return of White Fox’s remains to the Pawnee Nation in 1996.

NH

95

02

2014

100

123

 

 

 

 

Postscript: Building the First Nebraska State Capitol

 

NH

95

02

2014

132

132

Mary Ellen

Elaine

Rebecca

Ducey

Nowick

Bernthal

 

Author

Author

Author

Frank H Shoemaker, Self-Made Naturalist and Photographer

 

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

Through photography and extensive field notes, Shoemaker created a significant record of Nebraska landscapes, flora, and fauna during the early twentieth century.

NH

94

01

2013

002

019

Bill

Avery

 

Author

Folkways of a One-House Legislature

 

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

The Nebraska Unicameral has two sets of rules that govern how its members behave, one written and the other unwritten "folkways".

NH

94

01

2013

020

027

Mary Ann

May-Pumphrey

 

Author

"Send a Valentine to Your Valentine from Valentine, Nebraska": The Cachet Program

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

In 1941, the Valentine Post Office introduced a special Valentine's Day postal cachet inspired by the town's name.

NH

94

01

2013

028

035

Dan

Holtz

 

Author

The Folk Songs of Great Plains Homesteading: Anthems, Laments, and Political Songs

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

Homesteading songs illustrate the mindset of settlers, expressing their hopes, hardships, and demands for political action.

NH

94

01

2013

036

045

 

 

 

 

P.S. Hammer Gang

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

 

NH

94

01

2013

052

052

Paul

Putz

 

Author

A Church for the People and a Priest for the Common Man: Charles W Savidge, Omaha's Eccentric Reformer

Though he is little remembered today, the Rev. Charles Savidge was a modern innovator, a religious entrepreneur whose product was an idealized version of the old-time Methodism of America’s recent past, applied in practical ways to problems in the emerging industrialized city of Omaha.

NH

94

02

2013

054

073

David C

Shannon M

Turpie

Risk

 

Author

Author

"Definitely Representative of Nebraska": Jeanine Giller, Miss Nebraska 1972, and the Politics of Beauty Pagenats

 

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

Jeanine Giller competed in the Miss America pageant at a time when protestors accused the event of oppressing and commodifying women.

NH

94

02

2013

074

089

Patricia C

Gaster

 

Author

"A Celestial Visitor" Revisited: A Nebraska Newspaper Hoax from 1884

 

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

A blazing aerial object that crashed in rural Dudy County…a vividly written hoax that came from the fertile brain of the newsppaer editor James D Calhoun.

NH

94

02

2013

090

099

 

 

 

 

Postscript: Fires in Benkelman

 

 

NH

94

02

2013

108

108

Adam

Shapiro

 

Author

"Scopes Wasn't the First": Nebraska's 1924 Anti-Evolution Trial

 

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

How did the Nebraska case remain obscure while the Tennessee case became a national sensation?

NH

94

03

2013

110

119

Dennis N

Mihelich

 

Author

Ed Creighton's $100,000 Loan to Brigham Young

 

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

We can now verify that Ed Creighton did, indeed, loan $100,000 to Brigham Young.

NH

94

03

2013

120

123

James E

Potter

 

Author

"A Peculiar Set of Men": Nebraska Cowboys of the Open Range

 

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

This is the story of the real-life era of the great cattle drives and the open range.

NH

94

03

2013

124

145

Rebecca J

Anderson

 

Author

"Grandma Gabel, she brought Ralph": Midwifery and the Lincoln, Nebraska, Department of Health in the Early Twentieth Century

 

By the early twentieth century most American births were attended by physicians, but Lincoln’s

Germans from Russia preferred their traditional midwives. Unable to persuade women to switch to physicians, the local health department instead provided medical training for midwives – an example of a public health agency

attempting to work within the value system of a community.

NH

94

04

2013

158

175

Lois B

Arnold

 

Author

Barbours (The): A Family in Paleontology

 

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

Erwin H Barbour, Carrie Barbour, Harold Cook, and Eleanor Barbour Cook were among the family members instrumental in all aspects of Nebraska paleontology in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

NH

94

04

2013

176

187

John E

Carter

 

Author

Birth of the South Omaha Stockyards (The): A Photographic Essay

 

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

A careful look at three photos of the South Omaha stockyards of the 1880s.

NH

94

04

2013

188

195

Roger

Welsch

 

Author

What Can be Gained by sitting Down, Shutting Up, and Listening

 

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

Keynote address to the Eighth Annual Chief Standing Bear Breakfast of 2013

NH

94

04

2013

196

199

Deb

Arenz

 

Author

Illustrator's Pencil (The): John Falter from Nebraska to the Saturday Evening Post

 

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

Born in Plattsmouth and raised in Falls City, John Falter became one of the nation's most successful illustrators because he knew how to capture the spirit of the times. His illustrations for ads, articles, and magazine covers provide a window into mid-twentieth century American culture.

NH

93

01

2012

002

027

Chris

Rasmussen

 

Author

Vox Populi of Omaha: Todd Storz and the Top 40 Radio Format in American Culture

 

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

Omaha radio station owner Todd Storz played a key role in pioneering the Top 40 format in the 1950s. He was a figure of national significance, permanently changing radio programming with an approach that was "vibrantly populist, crassly commercial, and undeniably young."

NH

93

01

2012

028

045

Daniel D

Spegel

 

Author

"Big, Ugly Red Brick Buildings": The Fight to Save Jobbers Canyon

 

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

Omaha city leaders touted the Jobbers Canyon warehouse district as a key to downtown redevelopment, before ConAgra decided it wanted the land. Thus ensued the largest-ever demolition of a district listed on the National Register of Historic Places

NH

93

02

2012

054

083

Nick

Batter

 

Author

Shoulders of Atlas (The): Rural Communities and Nuclear Missile Base Construction in Nebraska, 1958-1962

 

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

Base construction for America's first intercontinental ballistic missile, the atlas, pushed several rural Nebraska communities to the front lines of the Cold War, bringing needed jobs, but also drawing protestors c contesting the nuclear program.

NH

93

02

2012

084

101

John T

Bauer

 

Author

Gliddenites are Coming (The)! Nebraska and the 1909 Glidden Tour

 

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

In July 1909, Nebraskans witnessed firsthand the most popular and spectacular Glidden Tour. This multi-state driving tour was not a race; it was a reliability run meant to challenge the driving skills of early automobilists and the reliability of their machines. The event promoted the automobile as a practical and desirable means of travel-a message that Nebraskans were already primed to accept.

NH

93

03

2012

110

125

Patricia C

Gaster

 

Author

Kate Martin and Lincoln's Historic St Charles Hotel

 

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

Located in what is now known as Lincoln's Haymarket District, the St. Charles Hotel served city residents and the traveling public from the 1860s until 1918, during which time Lincoln grew from a frontier settlement to a mature capital city. The hotel's story is intertwined with that of Catherine "Kate" Martin, an Irish immigrant whose career spanned four decades, three husbands, and two fires.

NH

93

03

2012

126

137

James E

Potter

 

Author

"Wearing the Hempen Neck-Tie": Lynching in Nebraska

 

 

Whether the victims were accused of horse theft, murder, or rape, lynching is often viewed as frontier vigilantism that operated before the establishment of courts and law enforcement. This notion, however, does not square with the historical record of the more than fifty Nebraskans who died at the hands of lynch mobs.

NH

93

03

2012

138

153

Tina

Koeppe

 

Author

Best-Dressed Doll in the World (The): Nebraska's Own Terri Lee

 

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

Founded and run by women, the Terri Lee Company of Lincoln, Nebraska, was ahead of its time, introducing plastic dolls, including several black dolls, as early as 1947. With high-quality production standards and clever marketing materials that promoted Terri Lee as a companion and not just a doll, the toy caught the hearts and imaginations of little girls in a revolutionary way.

NH

93

04

2012

162

181

Amanda N

Johnson

 

Author

Illuminating the west: The Wonder of Electric Lighting at Omaha's Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition of 1898

 

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

Electric lighting was as important to the Omaha fair as the Ferris Wheel was to Chicago’s 1893 Columbian Exposition: a focal point that garnered publicity and gate receipts while demonstrating the West’s technological and economic progress. The fair’s extensive use of outdoor incandescent lighting was unprecedented and an object of wonder to fairgoers.

NH

93

04

2012

182

191

Mark

Larry

Smith

Walklin

 

Author

Author

Early Years of Talk Radio (The): WJAG, Norfolk, Nebraska

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

Political talk dominates the AM airwaves today, but in 1946 and 1947, Norfolk station WJAG found its broadcast license in jeopardy due to controversial on-air commentary.

NH

92

01

2011

002

013

Jo L Wetherilt

Behrens

 

Author

“Painting the Town”: How Merchants Marked the Visual Arts to Nineteenth-Century Omahans

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

How does one build an art community in a frontier town? As Omaha grew, local merchants used their wealth and influence to promote art appreciation and the concept of art patronage.

NH

92

01

2011

014

039

David Royce

Murphy

 

Author

Art of the Panorama (The)

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

Panoramic art came to Omaha in the 1880s, but it had earlier connections to Nebraska and the Great Plains

NH

92

01

2011

040

041

Thomas

Irvin

 

Author

Political and Journalistic Battles to Create Nebraska’s Unicameral Legislature (The)

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

Though Senator George Norris was the unicameral’s best-known promoter, he had important allies during the campaign of 1934

NH

92

01

2011

042

049

David Delbert

Kruger

 

Author

Main Street Empire: J C Penney in Nebraska

By the late 1920s J C Penney had stores in more than fifty Nebraska communities – more than any retailer before or since.

NH

92

02

2011

054

069

Martha H

Fitzgerald

 

Author

Courtship of Two Doctors: 1930s Letters Spotlight Nebraska Medical Training

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

Joe Holoubek and Alice Baker trained in Omaha and New Orleans.  Their correspondence reveals the risks and day-to-day triumphs of 1930s medicine.

NH

92

02

2011

070

077

 

 

 

 

Postcards from Long Pine

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

Picture postcards from Nebraska’s Hidden Paradise provide glimpses of recreational travel in the 1910s and 1920s.

NH

92

02

2011

078

081

Rebecca A

Buller

 

Author

Intersections of Place, Time, and Entertainment in Nebraska’s Hidden Paradise

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

Hidden Paradise, located in a forested canyon at Long Pine, drew travelers by rail and automobile to enjoy a mixture of outdoor recreation and live entertainment in the early-to-mid twentieth century.

NH

92

02

2011

082

095

Jesse J

Otto

 

Author

Dan Desdunes: New Orleans Civil Rights Activist and “The Father of Negro Musicians of Omaha”

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

Dan Desdunes lived a remarkable life as a bandleader, educator, and civil rights activist. In his native New Orleans, he played a key role in an unsuccessful legal challenge to railway segregation that led to the U.S. Supreme Court's infamous Plessy v. Ferguson decision. In Omaha, he became a successful bandleader who also volunteered at Father Flanagan's Boys Home, where he trained the boys for fundraising musical tours.

NH

92

03

2011

106

117

Patricia C

Gaster

 

Author

Nebraska Statesman (The): The People Behind the Picture

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

An iconic Solomon Butcher photograph portrays a frontier newspaper office in Broken Bow. But the story of the two men who founded the short-lived paper has not been told until now. They came to central Nebraska full of ambition, but their lives soon went in very different directions.

NH

92

03

2011

118

123

David R

Christensen

 

Author

“I Don’t Know What We’d Have Done Without the Indians”: Non-Indian and Lakota Racial Relationships in Box Butte County’s Potato Industry, 1917-1960

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

A labor shortage during World War I left western Nebraska potato farmers facing the loss of their crop. They brought in Lakota (Sioux) Indians as harvesters, beginning a tradition that lasted from 1917 through the 1950s. The story is one both of prejudice and understanding, cooperation and conflict--and of long-lasting relationships forged by economic necessity.

NH

92

03

2011

124

147

James E

Potter

 

Author

Horses: The Army's Achilles' Heel in the Civil War Plains Campaigns of 1864-1865

 

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

Civil War armies relied heavily on horses. Armies in the field equipped with artillery, cavalry, and supply trains required one horse or mule, on average, for every two men. Horses fit for service became scarce by the war's final years. Far from the major eastern battlefields, regiments such as the First Nebraska Volunteer Cavalry felt the brunt of the equine shortage.

NH

92

04

2011

158

169

Kristin

Mapel Bloomberg

 

Author

"How shall We Make Beatrice Grow!" Clara Bewick Colby and the Beatrice Public Library Association in the 1870s

 

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

For a young frontier town like Beatrice, a library wasn't just about books. It was also a means for propagating social values, and it created pathways for women to exercise leadership in the community. The town's first privately funded library faced challenges of censorship, public indifference, and competition from an unexpected rival.

NH

92

04

2011

170

183

Todd

Guenther

 

Author

"The Kingdom of Heaven at Hand": Rev. Russel Taylor and the Struggle for Civil Rights in 1920s Omaha

 

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

In the racially charged atmosphere of 1920s Omaha, Russel Taylor-a minister, teacher, musician, activist, and former homesteader-threw himself into the struggle for dignity and civil rights. His story illustrates some of the difficulties facing black leaders during the generations between the end of slavery and the civil rights victories of the 1950s and 1960s.

NH

92

04

2011

184

193

John D

McDermott

 

Author

Plains Forts (The): A Harsh Environment

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

The United States Army had an almost impossible task to perform during the last half of the nineteenth century. Fewer than 15,000 men guarded some 3,000 miles of frontier and an equal length of seacoast.

NH

91

01

2010

002

015

August

James E

Edith

Edith

Scherneckau

Potter

Robbins

Robbins

 

Editor

Editor

Editor

Translator

Soldiering in the Platte Valley, 1865: A Nebraska Cavalryman’s Diary

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

After serving in Missouri and Arkansas in the Civil War, the First Nebraska Volunteer Cavalry was transferred to the Platte Valley to guard the transcontinental telegraph line and overland stagecoach stations. Pvt August Scherneckau’s diary tells of duty marked by exhausting riding, billowing dust, tormenting insects, chilling winds, numbing boredom, and an occasional dash after Indians.

NH

91

01

2010

016

051

David L

Bristow

 

Author

Post Script: Taking the Census 100 Years Ago

 

NH

91

01

2010

052

052

Thomas R

Buecker

 

Author

Letters from Home: Prisoner of War Mail at the Fort Robinson Camp during World War II

 

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

A 1943 envelope illustrates the long and complicated process of sending and receiving mail between Nazi Germany and the Fort Prisoner of War Camp in Nebraska.

NH

91

02

2010

058

065

Patricia C

Gaster

 

Author

Signing the Pledge: George B Skinner and the Red Ribbon Club of Lincoln

 

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

 

NH

91

02

2010

066

079

Paul L

Hedren

 

Author

Camp Sheridan, Nebraska: The Uncommonly Quiet Post on Beaver Creek

Camp Robinson and Camp Sheridan, both founded in 1874, had much in common.  Camp Robinson had a tumultuous history in the 1870s, however, while Camp Sheridan, under the influence of the leader Spotted Tail, existed quietly and then closed in 1881.  This article includes lists of the units stationed at Camp Sheridan, the camp’s commanding officers and its doctors.

NH

91

02

2010

080

093

Russ

Crawford

 

Author

Nebraska Football and Michael Oriard’s Bowled Over: A Review Essay

 

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

A recent book examines the politics and social changes of big-time college football during the past fifty years. Our reviewer examines issues of race, power, and money in the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s storied football program.

NH

91

02

2010

102

111

 

 

 

 

Post Script: Willa Cather: A Matter of Appearances

 

NH

91

02

2010

112

112

 

 

 

 

Contents

African Americans in Nebraska: A Special Double Issue

NH

91

03

2010

113

113

David

Bristow

 

 

Introduction

African Americans in Nebraska: A Special Double Issue

NH

91

03

2010

114

115

James E

Potter

 

Author

“Equality Before the Law”: Thoughts on the Origin of Nebraska’s State Motto

African Americans in Nebraska: A Special Double Issue

NH

91

03

04

2010

116

121

Tekla Ali

John R

Abigail B

Johnson

Wunder

Anderson

 

Author

Always on My Mind: Frederick Douglass’s Nebraska Sister

African Americans in Nebraska: A Special Double Issue

NH

91

03

04

2010

122

135

David J Peavler

Trowbridge

 

Author

“A Double Mixture”: Equality and Economy in the Integration of Nebraska Schools, 1858-1883

African Americans in Nebraska: A Special Double Issue

NH

91

03

04

2010

136

151

Orville D

Menard

 

Author

Lest We Forget: The Lynching of Will Brown, Omaha’s 1919 Race Riot

African Americans in Nebraska: A Special Double Issue

NH

91

03

04

2010

152

165

Jennifer

Hildebrand

 

Author

New Negro Movement in Lincoln, Nebraska (The)

African Americans in Nebraska: A Special Double Issue

NH

91

03

04

2010

166

189

Amy Helene

Forss

 

Author

Mildred Brown and the De Porres Club: Collective Activism in Omaha, Nebraska’s Near North Side, 1947-1960

African Americans in Nebraska: A Special Double Issue

NH

91

03

04

2010

190

205

 

 

 

 

Postscript: Mocking the Klan

 

African Americans in Nebraska: A Special Double Issue

NH

91

03

04

2010

220

220

 

 

 

 

“Out here among the infernal Red skins”: Frank Appleton’s 1874 Letter from Red Cloud Agency

­

Appleton, a young clerk at the Red Cloud Agency, wrote to his family just weeks before he was fatally shot by a Minneconjou warrior.  His letter describes an Indian dance that he had seen and begs for news of family and friends. 

NH

90

01

2009

002

004

 

 

 

 

The Clay County Pig Club Song, 1922

Club members sang the praises of modern hog farming practices

NH

90

01

2009

005

005

John A

Sautter

 

Author

Social Transformation and the Farmers’ Alliance Experience: Populism in Saunders County, Nebraska

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

Drought and depression led to radical politics in 1890s Nebraska. Saunders County didn’t fit the typical profile, but became a Populist stronghold thanks to its robust Farmers’ Alliance culture.

NH

90

01

2009

006

021

Daniel D

Spegel

 

Author

The Missouri National Recreational River: An Unlikely Alliance of Landowners and Conservationists

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

In 1978 lawmakers hailed a fragile alliance of landowners and conservationists who sought to protect a rare “natural” stretch of the Missouri River. The result was not what they expected.

NH

90

01

2009

022

041

Oliver B

Pollak

 

Author

Looking for “Wide-Awake” Young People: Commercial Business Colleges in Nebraska, 1873-1950

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

High schools taught no office skills. Colleges taught the classics. By the late nineteenth century, entrepreneurs founded business colleges as an alternative to both.

NH

90

01

2009

042

050

James E

Potter

 

Author

Post Script:  “Bert” Martin’s Little Secret

 

NH

90

01

2009

056

056

Jill

Koelling

 

Author

Collecting Parks

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

Edward and Margaret Gehrke’s photographs and travel diaries are an important source documenting early travel to America’s national parks.

NH

90

02

2009

058

065

John Curtis

John E

Jenkins

Carter

 

Author

Introduction

The National Game at Cody

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

Did a legendary Sandhills baseball game between the Spade and Diamond Bar ranches really take place in 1890? It turns out that a hilarious 1916 account of the game was based on real people and real events…with some improvements

NH

90

02

2009

066

081

Patricia C

Gaster

 

Author

Growing Celery in the Platte Valley

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

A brief look at a forgotten experiment in Nebraska agriculture

NH

90

02

2009

082

083

Kristin Mapel

Bloomberg

 

Author

“Striving for Equal Rights for All”: Woman Suffrage in Nebraska 1855-1882

 

Three times in the nineteenth century Nebraska considered granting full suffrage to women.  When the third attempt ended in a resounding defeat in 1882, the suffrage movement abandoned the goal of achieving legislative change one state at a time.  The national campaign waged after that Nebraska defeat culminated in the passage and ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment to the US Constitution thirty years later. 

NH

90

02

2009

084

103

 

 

 

 

Post Script: Tom Mix in Omaha

 

NH

90

02

2009

112

112

Anne Beiser

Allen

 

Author

A Scandal in Niobrara: The Controversial Career of Rev Samuel D Hinman

 

The Reverend Samuel Dutton Hinman served for seventeen years as an Episcopal missionary, government translator and advocate for the Dakota.  In 1878 his superior dismissed him in disgrace because of persistent rumors of impropriety.  The author suggests that Hinman’s reputation as an “Indian lover” may have been responsible for the rumors

NH

90

03

2009

114

129

Patricia C

Gaster

 

Author

Locating Callaway

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

Founded in 1885, Callaway in Custer County experienced one of the hardest-fought town site battles in central Nebraska.

NH

90

03

2009

130

131

Jeff

Patrick

 

Editor

From Civilian Life to Army Life: Fred Pickering’s World War I Narrative

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

Though many Nebraskans served in the Great War, we have few war narratives written by them. Fred Pickering was a farmer from Ulysses, Nebraska, who wrote a lively account of army life for the folks back home.

NH

90

03

2009

132

161

 

 

 

 

Post Script: The State Fair in Lincoln

 

NH

90

03

2009

168

168

Kylie

Kinley

 

Author

Growing up on the Farm: Nebraska Farmer Youth Pages, 1904-1965

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

Nebraska Farmer magazine was the only outlet most rural Nebraska children had to reach the world outside their schools and farms. For half a century, they voiced their dreams, concerns, and questions in the magazine’s youth column.

NH

90

04

2009

170

179

Tina

Koeppe

 

Author

“Omaha Charley” and the Bristol Collection of Native American Artifacts

During the 1870s-1890s “Omaha Charley” Bristol traveled the dime museum and lecture hall circuit, giving lectures about Indian life and culture.  Visitors viewed his photographs and Indian artifacts and saw performances by entertainers.  Although some items were not authentic, the Bristol collection educated and continues to educate the public about Nebraska’s Native Americans and its “Wild West” era.  

NH

90

04

2009

180

189

Janet R Daly

Bednarek

 

Author

Creating an “Image Center”: Reimagining Omaha’s Downtown and Riverfront, 1986-2003

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

In 1986 downtown Omaha saw the loss of one major employer (Enron) and was facing the potential loss of another (ConAgra). The riverfront, meanwhile, was an industrial zone dominated by a lead refinery. Omaha’s return to the river involved an extensive reconceptualization of the downtown and riverfront.

NH

90

04

2009

190

207

Deb

Arenz

 

Author

For the People: Nebraska’s New Deal Art

EXCERPTS FROM THIS ISSUE

During a time of economic crisis, the federal government commissioned works of art that reflected the “American Scene.” Here are selected works from a current exhibit at the Nebraska History Museum.

NH

90

04

2009

208

211

David L

Bristow

 

Author

Post Script: A Western Nebraska Road Trip

 

NH

90

04

2009

232

232

L Robert

Puschendorf

 

Author

The Halls of Hallmark: The Nebraska Years

The Hall brothers’ formative years in Nebraska, and those of the youngest brother, Joyce Hall, became the inspiration that brought him success as the founder of Hallmark Cards, Inc., the world’s foremost supplier of greeting cards.

NH

89

01

2008

002

013

Dennis N

Mihelich

 

Author

From the Depths: Prince Hall Masonry in Nebraska, 1930-1960

Prince Hall Masonry is an African American fraternal organization that arose because blacks were excluded from white Masonic lodges. The Prince Hall Mason Grand Lodge of Nebraska (PHGLN) nearly died out in the 1930s and then soared to new heights during the 1950s. This article details the turbulent thirty years between the onset of the Great Depression and the dawn of the 1960s.

NH

89

01

2008

014

025

James E

Potter

 

Author

The Governor’s House, the People’s House: Nebraska Governors’ Residences

The idea that Nebraska should provide living quarters for its governors was slow to catch on.  Finally, in 1899 the state purchased a house that became the first of two official residences in which Nebraska governors have lived.

NH

89

01

2008

026

041

James

Potter

 

Author

Post Script: Mr Clarke’s Long Bridge

 

NH

89

01

2008

052

052

William E

Lass

 

Author

Mythical Platte River Voyage of the Steamboat El Paso (The)

While the El Paso was a real steamboat, her alleged Platte River trip was a myth.

NH

89

02

2008

054

066

Roger P

Davis

 

Author

“Service not Power”: The Early Years of the Nebraska Commission on Mexican-Americans, 1971-1975

Political and social changes after World War II eventually resulted in more equitable treatment for the Latino community in Nebraska.  Although that community’s splinter groups argued for years over concepts

of identity and strategies for effective action, in 1972 Nebraska became the first state in the nation to establish a

Statutory agency charged with advocacy on behalf of the Hispanic population.

NH

89

02

2008

067

083

Patricia C

Gaster

 

Author

A Fallen Victim to “the Liquor Curse”: The Life and Tragic Death of Samuel D Cox

The 1906 murder of a well-known newspaperman and temperance advocate may have been a factor in the adoption of restrictions on saloons and alcohol consumption in Nebraska.

NH

89

02

2008

084

093

James E

Potter

 

Author

Post Script: Mr Bryan’s Day in the Sun

 

NH

89

02

2008

100

100

Vicki

Howard

 

Author

The Rise and Fall of Rudge & Guenzel: From Independent Retailer to Department Store Chain

 

Downtown department stores, such as Lincoln’s Rudge & Guenzel, seemed to be from another, more authentic world that has little in common with today’s commercial spaces.

NH

89

03

2008

102

119

Nathan B

Sanderson

 

Author

More Than a Potluck: Shared Meals and Community-Building in Rural Nebraska at the Turn of the Twentieth Century

 

Shared meals were the cornerstone of events and celebrations in Nebraska’s early years, offering rural families a chance to gather, socialize, and escape the lonely drudgery that filled much of their lives.

NH

89

03

2008

120

131

John E

Carter

 

Author

The Platte River Road in 1866: Charles Savage’s Visual Narrative

In 1866 Charles Savage made the earliest known photograph of Chimney Rock and several other rare images, providing a unique visual record of one of the last years of wagon travel along Nebraska’s Great Platte River Road.

NH

89

03

2008

132

141

James E

Potter

 

Author

Post Script: The Chrisman Sisters

 

NH

89

03

2008

152

152

Alexandra M

Wagner

 

Author

Grasshoppered: America’s Response to the 1874 Rocky Mountain Locust Invasion

It was a plague of biblical proportions, influencing generations of federal agricultural policy.

NH

89

04

2008

154

167

Patricia C

Gaster

 

Author

“A 1914 Cartoon Calendar”: Drawings by Guy R Spencer

 

Longtime Omaha World-Herald cartoonist Guy Spencer displayed his wit and his unique style of drawing in a series of cartoons for every month of the year.

NH

89

04

2008

168

175

Todd

Guenther

 

Author

The Empire Builders: An African American Odyssey in Nebraska and Wyoming

 

This article provides vivid details of ex-slave African American families lives as they became homesteaders in Nebraska in the late nineteenth century and in Wyoming in the early twentieth century. In 1908 they founded the town of Empire, Wyoming, about thirty miles northwest of Scottsbluff. They settled there because of a Wyoming school segregation law that allowed the black settlers to form their own public school and hire their own teacher. In most ways, the lives of these black settlers at Empire differed little from those of their white contemporaries. Drought and a poor agricultural economy eventually led to the community’s abandonment by the mid-1920s.

NH

89

04

2008

176

200

James E

Potter

 

Author

Post Script: Dedicating Nebraska’s Lincoln Memorial, 1912

 

NH

89

04

2008

222

224

Ephriam D

Dickson

III

Author

Capturing the Lakota Spirit, Photographers at the Red Cloud and Spotted Tail Agencies

Nineteenth-century photographers specialized in portraits but also sold views of general interest.  On their way to take pictures of the Black Hills gold rush, eight hotographers visited the Red Cloud and Spotted Tail Agencies between 1874 and 1877.  The article includes short biographies of the photographers, details of their work at the agencies, and locations of archives of their agency photographs.

NH

88

01

02

2007

002

025

L, R W

 

 

 

Ballad on Nebraska Fuel

This verse in praise of cow chips first appeared in the Hooker County Tribune (Mullen, Nebraska) in 1934.

NH

88

01

02

2007

026

027

Patricia C

Gaster

 

Author

Bad Grammar and Sensational Style, The Daily Bumble Bee and the Fight for Prohibition in 1890

Long before Nebraska ratified the Eighteenth Amendment to the US Constitution, anti-alcohol sentiment was a contentious force in territorial and state politics.  The Daily Bumble Bee figured prominently in the fight for Prohibition in 1890 in Nebraska, though it survived less than one week.  It ceased publication as soon as the results of the 1890 election were definitely known, having provided a last-minute boost to the pro-amendment cause.

NH

88

01

02

2007

028

041

Raymond

Screws

 

Author

Tools of Ethnic Identity

The “melting pot” view of American society may hold some truth, but settlements of Czechs and Swedes established in Saunders County, Nebraska, between 1870 and 1910 were surprisingly slow to melt.

NH

88

01

02

2007

042

054

Don

Cunningham

 

Author

Post Script: The Lincoln Flood of 1908

 

NH

88

02

02

2007

060

060

Sharon L

Kennedy

 

Author

Nebraska Women Artists, 1880 – 1950

Highly talented, quietly indomitable, but still largely overlooked in the history of art in Nebraska, twelve nineteenth and early twentieth century women left an enduring artistic legacy and greatly influenced the arts in this young prairie state.

NH

88

03

2007

062

095

John

Carter

 

Author

Post Script: A Pan of Fudge

 

NH

88

03

2007

108

108

Deborah

Fink

 

Author

Who Are We? Race and Ethnicity in a 1950s Nebraska Town

Nebraskans, like other Americans, were generally unaware of their specific European connections and identities in the 1950s.  Only more recently has ethnicity has come to be recognized as a source of  Nebraska beliefs and values.

NH

88

04

2007

110

125

Lori

Cox-Paul

 

Author

John M Chivington “The Reverend Colonel” “Marry-Your-Daughter” “Sand Creek Massacres"

A famous military commander and preacher, Chivington was a very controversial figure. He led the force that butchered a sleeping Indian village in the Sand Creek Massacre. His private life included lying, theft, arson, and marriage to his former daughter-in-law, whom he then abandoned.

NH

88

04

2007

126

142

137

 148

 

 

 

 

The Long View: Reading a Photograph

Four historians and a photographer “read” two photographs—a panoramic from Garden County taken in 1917 and a modern-day equivalent.

NH

88

04

2007

138

141

Debra

Brownson

 

Author

Post Script: Everyone Come!

 

NH

88

04

2007

168

168

James E

Potter

 

Author

Putting Boyd County on the Map: Adjusting Nebraska’s Northern Boundary

The tragedy of the Ponca Indians led to Nebraska’s last significant land acquisition, Boyd County.  The story of how the northern boundary of Nebraska was negotiated in the 1880s includes government ineptitude and bad faith, political manipulation, and the total disruption of the Poncas’ lives.

NH

87

01

2006

002

 009

David

Murphy

 

Author

Bold and Daring: The Lone Oak

The Lone Oak building, five miles west of Lincoln on U S Highway 6, built in 1944 and occupied in 1945, was constructed with straw bale technology. The two-story building in Lincoln appeared to be the embodiment of modernity using large, fixed, plate glass windows and modernistic design. The selection of the use of walls built of bales of hay was influenced by wartime wood and steel shortages.

NH

87

01

2006

010

015

David

Murphy

 

Author

The Lone Oak – How Did They Do That?

This article contains an explanation of the straw bale structural system of the Lone Oak Building, built in 1944 six miles west of Lincoln, Nebraska.

NH

87

01

2006

016

017

John E

Carter

 

Author

Tragedy at the Lone Oak

On August 26, 1958, the owners of The Lone Oak Building six miles west of Lincoln, were found dead of carbon monoxide poisoning. This is the story of their deaths and the ensuing legal battles of the families of the deceased, Thomas M Bentley and Nola Bailey.

NH

87

01

2006

018

026

 

 

 

 

Recommended by Duncan Hines. Isn’t that a Cake Mix?

Today the name Duncan Hines is associated only with packaged foods, but in the middle of the twentieth century, Duncan Hines was a food critic whose recommendations strongly influenced American’s restaurant choices.

NH

87

01

2006

027

027

Thomas D

Thiessen

 

Author

Wallace Cadet Taylor and the Last US Volunteers

This is the story of the military career of a little-known Nebraska Officer, who served in both the Spanish-American and Philippine-American wars.  As such, it is a case study in the evolution of the American "citizen soldier.

NH

87

01

2006

028

043

John

Carter

 

Author

Post Script: Nebraska’s Straw Bale Church

This article presents a brief description of Pilgrim Holiness Church in Arthur, Nebraska, constructed of rye straw bales in 1927-1928.

NH

87

01

2006

052

052

L Robert

Puschendorf

 

Author

Petroleum, Politics, and Prices: Omaha’s Gas War of 1924

Outrage at high gas prices isn't new -- in 1924 the governor threatened to open state stations, the attorney general took fifteen oil companies to court, and a gas war was good news to Omaha drivers

NH

87

02

2006

054

081

L Robert

Puschendorf

 

Author

Standard Oil’s “Bungalow” Filling Stations

The first filling stations were a far cry from today's sleek emporiums offering not only gas and oil but everything from lug nuts to latte. In 1914, however, Standard Oil began to make improvements.

NH

87

02

2006

082

085

John

Carter

 

Author

Post Script: Gasahol—The First Time Around

 

NH

87

02

2006

096

096

Tom

White

 

Author

From McCook to Whispering Smith

Frank H Spearman, a prolific writer of railroad fiction, created courageous characters who risked all for order and progress. His writing style may seem idealistic and stilted today, but his early stories are reservoirs of cultural and historical value to Nebraskans. They offer rich profiles of men who dared to run clattering, primitive machines across the Plains, forging a lifeline to settlers.

NH

87

03

2006

098

119

Oliver

Pollak

 

Author

Nebraska’s Libraries at War, 1917-1919

In the First World War, Nebraska had the opportunity to share of one million dollars that the War Council hoped to raise by October 1, 1917, to build, equip, and stock libraries for soldiers in thirty-two camps and cantonments.  It was believed that the citizen army would be more effective and efficient if the troops lived clean, intelligent, and moral lives, and the American Library Association worked diligently to support the war effort by working toward that end.

NH

87

03

2006

120

132

Donald B

Cunningham

 

Author

Post Script: Ghost in the Camera (The)

 

NH

87

03

2006

140

140

Gottlieb F

David Z

Richard E

Oehler

Smith

Jensen

 

Author

Author

Editor

Visit to the Pawnee (A)

Two Pennsylvania members of the Church of the Brethren visited the Pawnee in Nebraska in 1851 to determine whether the Indians would welcome the presence of missionaries. Heavy rains made tent camping and river crossings very difficult for the travelers. This account of their trip concludes with a description of the “Manner and Customs of the Pawnee” that emphasizes the subservient role of Pawnee women.

NH

87

04

2006

142

172

John

Carter

 

Author

Post Script: Nebraska Corn Helps Win the War

 

NH

87

04

2006

192

192

Lewis O

Saum

 

Author

Good Die First (The): The Meteoric and Brief Career of O H Rothacker

In 1886 Ottomar H Rothacker of the Omaha Republican began a campaign of "slashing and murderous invective" aimed at the Omaha Bee and its fiery editor Edward Rosewater.

NH

86

01

2005

002

013

Joseph G

Rosa

 

Author

Wild Bill Hickok, Buffalo Bill Cody, and the Grand Buffalo Hunt at Niagara Falls

"Wild Bill" Hickok, billed as "the most celebrated Scout and Hunter of the Plains," began his show-business career in 1872 in Niagara Falls with a staged hunt and a few weary buffalo captured in Nebraska.

NH

86

01

2005

014

025

Tommy

Thompson

 

Author

Who Killed Maud Rubel? A Case of Black and White in Omaha, 1894

When a young white woman, Maud Rubel, was found dead in South Omaha, suspects included Sam Payne, an African-American who had lived in a building near the crime scene.  In spite of conflicting eyewitness reports and the fact that Payne recanted his original confession, he was convicted.  Racial beliefs of the day, expressed in newspaper articles, played a role in his sentencing.  After ten years in prison Payne was pardoned by the governor.

NH

86

01

2005

026

036

 

 

 

 

Post Script: Wild Bill and Rock Creek Station

 

NH

86

01

2005

044

  044

Melissa

Marsh

 

Author

Still the Old Marlene: Hollywood at the Fort Robinson Prisoner of War Camp

Could Hollywood help the War Department convince German prisoners to reject their country's Nazi regime and accept American style democracy without violating the Geneva Convention?

NH

86

02

03

2005

046

 061

Steven J

Ramold

 

Author

“Altogether a Horrible Spectacle”: Public Executions in Nebraska, 1891

Four men convicted of violent murders committed between 1888 and 1890 were all hanged in Nebraska in 1891, although multiple executions in the state in a single year were exceptional.  The author describes the crimes, arrests, trials, and deaths of the four men.

NH

86

02

03

2005

062

077

 

 

 

 

Come an’ Get It!

From a dozen cowboys at the chuck wagon to a chic 1953 housewife making cookies in her Lincoln kitchen, photographs from the NSHS archives show that eating is the most universal of cultural activities.

NH

86

02

03

2005

078

091

Michael

Kuzma

 

Author

Kicking the Habit: Nebraska’s 1905 Anti-Cigarette Law

Anti-smoking sentiment is in the air, but this is not the first time we've tried to kick the habit. In 1905 the state legislature enacted tobacco bans to protect Nebraskans' health and morals.

NH

86

02

03

2005

092

096

 

 

 

 

Post Script: James C Olson, 1917-2005

Photo

NH

86

02

03

2005

108

108

Kathleen

Alonso

 

Author

3,937 Pounds of Letters: National Air Mail Week in Nebraska, May 1938

For one day in 1938, hundreds of Nebraska towns-from Chadron to Beatrice, Emerson to Bridgeport, with Ong and Elsie, Wauneta and Wilber in between- had direct airmail service.

NH

86

04

2005

110

123

John

Carter

 

Author

Landmarks on Paper

For Air Mail Week in 1938 more than two hundred Nebraska communities created their own commemorative designs for airmail envelopes, and the result is a study in local pride.

NH

86

04

2005

124

131

Liz

Watts

 

Author

Flying Newsboy Takes to the Air (The)

The McCook Daily Gazette was the first newspaper to deliver by air on a regular basis.  Harry D Strunk, publisher of the Gazette, adopted air delivery to increase recognition of the purchasing power of farm families, poor road conditions, rising postal rates, and the public’s fascination with aviation.

NH

86

04

2005

132

145

 

 

 

 

Special Supplement to Nebraska History

Six nineteenth-century maps show the evolution of the shape of Nebraska.

NH

85

01

2004

001

001

Sandra K

Sagala

 

Author

Buffalo Bill Cody v Doc Carver: The Battle over the Wild West

Buffalo Bill Cody and Doc Carver were partners during the 1883 season of Cody and Carver’s Wild West, a touring outdoor western show. Their partnership dissolved after one year, and their bitter legal dispute over control of the name “Wild West” made them adversaries for the rest of their lives.

NH

85

01

2004

002

015

Oliver B

Pollak

 

Author

Write Soon: Small Stories from Penny Postcards

Postcards written between 1908 and 1949 feature pictures of Nebraska’s Carnegie libraries and messages that suggest the concerns of Nebraskans of that time.

NH

85

01

2004

016

023

Michael

De La Garza

 

Author

Lynching of Juan Gonzalez (The)

Omaha Police Detective Tom Ring was gunned down in 1915.  A statewide search for his killer ended with the death of a Mexican immigrant, Juan Gonzalez.  Spectators did not agree about the circumstances of  Gonzalez’s death, but there is evidence of racist hysteria directed against him.

NH

85

01

2004

024

037

Mark R

Ellis

 

Author

Hanging Out the Shingle: Nineteenth-Century Lawyers in Nebraska’s Platte Valley

The lawyers who were among the early settlers in the Platte Valley made important contributions as community builders. Their professional achievements contradict the notion that the Great Plains was a lawless region.

NH

85

01

2004

038

052

Richard E

 

Jensen

 

Editor

“One Thousand Miles from Home on the Wild Prairie”: Charles B Darwin’s 1849 Nebraska Diary

Darwin‟s diary recounts his 1849 trip from Tennessee to the gold mines of California, emphasizing his encounters with Indians, traders, and fur trappers. The section reproduced in this article extends from his arrival in western Iowa to his departure from Fort Laramie.

NH

85

02

2004

058

114

James A

Roeder

 

Author

One Hundred and Second Congress and the Niobrara Scenic River (The): Old Arguments, New Compromises

The Niobrara Scenic River Designation Act of 1991 ended a prolonged struggle between those who would have preferred to dam the river and those who saw it as an environmental treasure. The legislation sought to permanently preserve the Niobrara while protecting the interests of local landowners.

NH

85

03

2004

116

125

Donald B

Cunningham

 

Author

Niobrara Valley (The): A Biological Crossroads

In the central valley of the Niobrara River plant and animal species of all climatic zones overlap and hybridize.

NH

85

03

2004

126

127

James E

Potter

 

Author

Legend of Rawhide Revisited (The)

The Rawhide legend is associated with the mid-nineteenth century overland migrations of the American West. Shooting an Indian without provocation and skinning a man alive are consistent themes in many versions of the story. This article includes variations on the basic tale and an alternate explanation for places named Rawhide.

NH

85

03

2004

128

139

Angelo J

Robert P

Louisa

Nash

 

Author

Author

Growing Pains in the River City: The Development of Professional Baseball in Nineteenth-Century Omaha

Beginning in 1867, when a group of interested Omaha citizens met to form the Omaha Base Ball Club, organized baseball struggled to maintain itself in Nebraska as it did all over the country. Clubs and leagues came and went, battling indifferent management, inadequate financing, small audiences, and uneven performance.

NH

85

04

2004

148

155

Andrea I

Faling

 

Author

Local Heroes: Nebraska Hometown Baseball

Civil War veterans brought baseball with them on their westward migration to Nebraska. As this collection of photographs shows, most small towns could field a team of local players by the end of the nineteenth century.

NH

85

04

2004

156

171

Gregory

Bond

 

Author

Too Much Dirty Work: Race, Manliness, and Baseball in Gilded Age Nebraska

In 1892, the Nebraska State League for baseball was partially integrated. Controversy abounded over whether “colored” players had both the ability to play and the ability to be “colored gentlemen.” The League’s early demise was only partially due to the rampant racial controversy. Finances and contract jumping also played a part.

NH

85

04

2004

172

185

Jeffrey

Powers-Beck

 

Author

Role New to the Race (A): A New History of the Nebraska Indians

The Nebraska Indians baseball team played longer and more successfully than the many other American Indian professional teams of the early twentieth century. The players confronted discrimination, but their skilled performances earned the admiration of baseball fans.

NH

85

04

2004

186

203

David

Murphy

 

Author

Old Cuts in New Wood, Traditional Czech Carpentry in the Central Great Plains

Early Czech farmers in Nebraska used the construction techniques of their Central European ancestors. Meticulous execution characterizes their carpentry.

NH

84

01

2003

002

017

James E

Potter

 

Author

Twenty five More Years, The Nebraska State Historical Society, 1979 – 2003

Achievements of the Society in the period ending in 2003 include the construction of the permanent visitor center at Chimney Rock and important advances in conservation and digital imaging. A “Milestones” section at the end of the article lists historic properties, exhibitions, awards, publications, and members of the governing board.

NH

84

01

2003

018

035

Valerie Sherer

Richard

Mathes

Lowitt

 

Editor

Editor

“I Plead for Them”

 

An 1882 Letter from Alice Cunningham Fletcher to Senator Henry Dawes

Fletcher’s letter, based on her experience on the Omaha Reservation, recommends that the government recognize the individual needs of different Indian groups.  She describes the daily life of the Omahas and offers practical strategies that would help to ensure their adaptation to reservation life. 

NH

84

01

2003

036

041

James E

Potter

 

Author

A Cow on the Roof and a Bullet in the Head? A New Look at a Solomon D Butcher Photograph

Solomon D Butcher’s 1886 photograph of the Sylvester Rawding homestead at West Union, Custer County, Nebraska, has appeared many times.  This article delves into more minute details now evident with digital scanning technology.

NH

84

01

2003

042

  047

 

 

 

 

Recovered Views: African American Portraits, 1912 – 1925

The editor’s note and an introductory essay by Edward F Zimmer and Abigail B Davis explain the significance of this traveling exhibition of forty early twentieth-century portraits made in Lincoln by John Johnson.  They provide an insider’s view of a small but thriving African American community in a growing city.  Notes following the photographs identify some of the people and sites pictured.

 

See also the article “The New Negro Movement in Lincoln, Nebraska”  for detailed comments on some of the pictures in “Recovered Views.”

NH

84

02

2003

059

114

 

 

 

 

African American Resources at the Nebraska State Historical Society

This list includes the Historical Society’s most significant resources related to the African American experience in Nebraska.  It describes archival collections, gives bibliographical information for library materials, and provides contact information for other Nebraska institutions holding additional materials.

NH

84

02

2003

115

116

Randolph W

Baxter

 

Author

Homo-Hunting in the Early Cold War: Senator Kenneth Wherry and the Homophobic Side of McCarthyism

During the 1940s, fears of sexual “perversions” in America grew markedly. These fears spilled over into the political realm.  Joseph McCarthy and his fellow Nebraska Republican Kenneth Wherry figured prominently in this historic movement.

NH

84

03

2003

118

132

Jonathan P

Herzog

 

Author

Our Sacred Lithuanian Word: St Anthony’s Thirst for Cultural Homogeneity

South Omaha’s Lithuanian immigrant families wanted their church preserve their ethnic heritage. They accordingly forced their bishop to accept Lithuanian replacements for St. Anthony’s Polish pastor and the Ursuline Sisters who had served at the parish school.

NH

84

03

2003

133

141

Tommy R

Thompson

 

Author

John D Brady, the Philippine-American War, and the Martial Spirit in Late 19th Century America

John Brady volunteered in 1898 to join the First Nebraska Infantry Regiment, United States Volunteers. His journal and letters sent home to Nebraska during sixteen months in the Philippines reveal misgivings about the conduct of the war, however, and in later life he spoke out against militarism.

NH

84

03

2003

142

153

James E

Potter

 

Author

Nebraska History on Nebraska Territory: A Reader’s Guide

The author describes twenty-nine Nebraska History articles concerning the Nebraska Territory. Topics discussed include the Territorial System and the Kansas-Nebraska Act, Government and Politics, Economic and Social Development, Land Acquisition and Agriculture, Indians and Indian Affairs, Military Affairs, and Prelude to Statehood.

NH

84

04

2003

162

175

 

 

 

 

A Governor’s Gallery: Chief Executives of Nebraska Territory, 1854-1867

Francis Burt, October 16-18, 1854; Thomas B Cuming (acting governor), October 18, 1854­February 20, 1855; October 25, 1857-January 12, 1858; Mark W Izard, February 20, 1855-October 25, 1857; William A Richardson, January 12, 1858-December 5, 1858; Samuel W Black, May 2, 1859-May 14, 1861; Alvin Saunders, May 15, 1861-March 27, 1867

NH

84

04

2003

176

176

 

 

 

 

Other Nebraska History Articles Relating to Nebraska Territory

This annotated bibliography includes Nebraska History articles on the territorial system and the Kansas-Nebraska Act, government and politics, economic and social development, land acquisition and agriculture, Indians and Indian affairs, military affairs, and the quest for statehood. There are also suggestions for further reading from other sources.

NH

84

04

2003

177

180

L Boyd

Finch

 

Author

Variegated Life of Norfolk’s’ Diamond Dick

Richard Tanner (1869-1943) travelled with a circus as a crack shot when he was a young man. Later he had a medical career in Norfolk and then recreated himself as “Diamond Dick,” a medicine show practitioner who claimed to have known all the famous characters of the Wild West.

NH

84

04

2003

181

193

Patricia C

Gaster

 

Author

“Straight Politics Pays After All”: Political Patronage and the Lincoln Post Office Fight, 1893 – 1894

A year-long battle over the appointment of a new Lincoln postmaster followed the election of Grover Cleveland. Eight major candidates supported by prominent Nebraska Democrats sought the position. At the last minute a previously unmentioned candidate with less service to the party emerged and won the job.

NH

84

04

2003

194

205

James

Potter

 

Editor

“Prairie Plow was at Work” (The): J Sterling Morton’s 1859 Address on Nebraska Agriculture

At Nebraska‟s first fair J Sterling Morton provided a personal view of the Territory‟s agricultural history. He condemned the financial speculation in town lots that had led to the panic of 1857 but proudly recounted the bountiful harvests that followed.

NH

84

04

2003

206

213

Dennis N

Mihelich

 

Author

Joslyns of Omaha: Opulence and Philanthropy

George and Sarah Joslyn were Nebraska’s wealthiest family in the early 1900s. Their lavish lifestyle was widely recognized. Their philanthropy, less well known in their time, still influences Omaha’s cultural life.

NH

83

01

2002

002

  014

Jill Marie

Koelling

 

Author

Nebraska’s Lincoln Ambrotypes

Two Abraham Lincoln ambrotypes (in-camera original images) are housed in Nebraska. One portrait commemorates the day in 1858 when Lincoln won the acquittal of an accused murderer. The circumstances of the second ambrotype are less certain, but some scholars believe that it commemorates Lincoln’s nomination to run for president in 1860.

NH

83

01

2002

015

018

Kingsley M

Bray

 

Author

Spotted Tail and the Treaty of 1868

Spotted Tail worked from 1866 on to create Brulé tribal consensus, gradually accepting the changes forced upon his people by government support for western settlement while doing all he could to protect their interests.  Adaptation to reservation life was an unpopular and difficult process, but Spotted Tail understood

that the Brulé band had no alternative.

NH

83

01

2002

019

035

Richard

Vaughan

 

Author

“Broad are Nebraska’s Rolling Plains”, The Early Writings of George Bird Grinnell

In 1870 Grinnell joined a Yale professor on a summer expedition to collect fossils in the West. He returned to Nebraska repeatedly over sixty years, recording his experiences in many books and articles.

NH

83

01

2002

036

046

George Bird

Grinnell

 

Author

“Camp Life West of the Missouri”: Among the Sand Hills of Nebraska”

The fossil-hunting expedition that brought Grinnell to the Sand Hills in 1870 was the first of many trips recorded in his essays and books. This reminiscence contrasts the relative ease of travel into the West by train in Grinnell‟s time and the experience of emigrants bound for Utah or California just a few years earlier. [Published under pen name Ornis]

NH

83

01

2002

047

  049

Andrew B

Wertheimer

 

Author

Admitting Nebraska’s Nisei: Japanese American Students at University of Nebraska, 1942 – 1945

Other universities initially refused to accept Japanese American students forced into World War II concentration camps.  The University of Nebraska was among the first to welcome them.  It eventually enrolled more Nisei students than all but two other institutions.  The author asserts that this controversial acceptance

resulted from humanitarian decisions made by a few individuals in Lincoln. 

NH

83

02

2002

058

072

James E

Potter

 

Author

Fact and Folklore in the Story of “John Brown’s Cave” and the Underground Railroad in Nebraska

This article examines available evidence in order to determine the extent to which John Brown’s Cave and the adjacent Mayhew log cabin in Nebraska City may or may not have contributed to the escape of fugitive slaves. It has been alleged that through Brown’s direct involvement, the “cave” was an important Underground Railroad station, sheltering scores if not hundreds of black fugitives who were making their way out of bondage. The article debunks the story of the cave, concluding that it is an example of folklore that demonstrates how generations of Nebraskans have come to regard the crusade against slavery as a meaningful part of their past.

NH

83

02

2002

073

088

Patricia C

Gaster

 

Author

Robert W Furnas, Nebraska Press Recollections, and the Oldest Newspaper Controversy

Robert W Furnas’ publication Nebraska Press Recollections, a state press history completed in 1874 endeavored to provide dates of establishment, suspension, and change of ownership of Nebraska newspapers that existed at the time and/or prior to 1874. While largely accurate, it failed to mention the Nebraska Herald of Nemaha. A 42-year feud ensued regarding which was the oldest continuously published paper in the state: the Nebraska Advertiser [Brownville] or the Nebraska City News.

NH

83

02

2002

089

097

Jerome A

Greene

 

Author

Faces of War: Five Soldiers of General Crook’s Big Horn and Yellowstone Expedition, 1876

A rare ferrotype shows five enlisted men who marched with Crook. Posing after the Starvation March, they wear a variety of uniform pieces and non-regulation civilian-style clothing in this portrait that commemorates their camaraderie during the Great Sioux War.

NH

83

02

2002

098

102

Harl

Dalstrom

 

Author

I’m Never Going to be Snowbound Again, The Winter of 1948 – 1949 in Nebraska

An examination of the effects of the winter of 1948 – 1949 in Nebraska illustrates key changes that took place in the state in the second half of the twentieth century.

NH

83

03

04

2002

109

166

Pamela

Riney-Kehrberg

 

Author

But What Kind of Work Do the Rest of you Do? Child Labor on Nebraska Farms, 1870-1920

Nebraska farm families were economic units, dependent upon the labor of children as well as adults. Children’s responsibilities ranged from simple daily chores to being the family’s primary farmers or housekeepers.

NH

82

01

2001

002

010

Patrick

Kennedy

 

Author

Nemaha County’s African American Community

The story of Nemaha County’s African American community involved a relatively small number people over a relatively short span of time. However, the experiences of these early black settlers raise questions whose answers may illustrate the broader African American experience in Nebraska. These questions concern the significance of small, one generational settlement as well as other patterns of African American settlement, such as those centered on the farmstead or the small community settled around employment (like the railroad). Other questions involve the interaction between blacks and whites, black social status, and racism in the press as well as the communities at large.

NH

82

01

2001

011

025

Dennis N

Mihelich

 

Author

George Joslyn, America’s First Media Mogul

George Joslyn gained national prominence by creating a virtual monopoly in the auxiliary printing business, supplying standardized, preprinted news to more than 12,000 newspapers in the United States.

NH

82

01

2001

026

037

Robert W

Larson

 

Author

Lakota Leaders and Government Agents: A Story of Changing Relationships

Led by determined chiefs like Red Cloud, Gall, and Crazy Horse, the Lakota Sioux resisted federal control during the first years of transition to the reservation system.  Only after the Battle of Wounded Knee and the Sioux Bill of 1889 did the federal overnment gain the upper hand.

NH

82

02

2001

047

057

Michael L

Tate

 

Author

Life Beyond Soldiering: Entrepreneurs, Investors, and Retirees

Many ex-soldiers remained in the West after separation from the army. Some established speculative enterprises, while others operated small businesses or ranches.

NH

82

02

2001

058

068

Jerome A

Greene

 

Author

Surrounding of Red Cloud and Red Leaf, 1876 (The): A Preemptive Maneuver of the Great Sioux War

Colonel Ranald S Mackenzie’s men encircled the villages of Red Cloud and Red Leaf under cover of darkness one night in 1876.  They confiscated horses and weapons and drove the Indians into Camp Robinson and eventually onto reservations in Dakota Territory and western Nebraska.  This dismounting and disarming campaign helped bring the Sioux War to a close the following year.  

NH

82

02

2001

069

075

 

 

 

 

Photographic Epilogue to the Great Sioux War (A)

In 1877 James H Hamilton photographed a group of army officers, veterans of the 1876 Sioux

campaigns, relaxing at the Camp Robinson post trader’s store.  Recent research has made it possible to identify those pictured and to more precisely date the photograph.

NH

82

02

2001

076

081

William Henry

Ellen F 

Richard E

Tappan

Tappan

Jensen

 

Editor

Editor

Editor

“A great place for gambling whiskey drinking & roguery”, A Fort Childs Diary, 1848

The Missouri Mounted Volunteers invited a civilian artist, William Henry Tappan, to accompany them and create a record of their service in Nebraska in 1848.  Tappan wrote in his diary about the soldiers’ daily lives: not only their frequent encounters with Native Americans, but also their buffalo hunts, games and entertainments, even a religious service.

NH

82

03

2001

090

121

Richard E

Jensen

 

Editor

Soldiers’ Letters from Fort Childs, 1848-49

This article includes letters from two military men stationed in Nebraska.  A private describes for his brother at home the daily routines and distractions of the Missouri Mounted Volunteers.  A captain in the regular army serving as commander of Fort Childs complains to his superior about inadequate shelter, clothing, and

medical resources at the fort.

NH

82

03

2001

122

129

William D

Lock

 

Author

“As Independent as We Wished”: Elizabeth Scott and Alice Fish of Blaine County, Nebraska

Scott and Fish ranched and lived together as partners for more than forty years, winning respect in their community. They experienced many of the successes and failures of early Plains settlement.

NH

82

04

2001

138

151

Fred W

Peterson

 

Author

Tradition, Style and Structure: the Anglo-American I-House in Nebraska

Features characteristic of the Gothic Revival Style appear in some traditional I-houses built in Nebraska between 1860 and 1900. Local builders introduced new methods and materials, however, creating a regional version of the I-house.

NH

82

04

2001

152

162

Timothy R

Mahoney

 

Author

Great Sheedy Murder Trial and the Booster Ethos of the Gilded Age (The)

The trial of Mary Sheedy and alleged co-conspirator “Monday” McFarland for the murder of Mary’s husband, John Sheedy, undermined the integrity of the “booster ethos,” shook middle class confidence, and exposed deep racial, gender, sexual, moral, and psychological tensions that threatened social order in Lincoln’s post-frontier society.

NH

82

04

2001

163

179

David J

Wishart

 

Author

Redemption of James Whitewater (The)

Convicted on circumstantial evidence of the murder of two white travelers in 1871, the Indian James Whitewater spent more than seventeen years in the Nebraska State Penitentiary. He eventually won release when the governor pardoned him in recognition of his good conduct while incarcerated.

NH

82

04

2001

180

 189

Andrea

Radke

 

Author

I Am Very Aspiring: Muirl Dorrough and the Alliance Junior Normal School

Teachers in the small town schools of the West in the early years of the twentieth century were often young and inexperienced. Muirl Dorrough was more capable and devoted than many, and her attendance at the Alliance Junior Normal School increased her motivation and raised her standards.

NH

81

01

2000

002

011

Virginia

Richard E

Foote

Jensen

 

Editor

Editor

“Enrout for Pikes Peak”: The 1860 Travel Diary of Gurdon P Lester

Lester, one of a number of Pike‟s Peak diarists, faithfully recorded his observations and experiences. His diary recounts the journey of eight Iowans who traveled across Nebraska Territory and into the Rocky Mountains in hopes of finding gold there. When he found no gold, he continued west to California.

NH

81

01

2000

012

022

Eric

Bachenberg

 

Author

Music from the Soil of the American Midwest: Howard Hanson, Educator, Composer, Conductor

Hanson, a Pulitzer Prize-winning composer (1896-1981), attributed his musical inspiration to the Nebraska prairies where he grew up. Bachenberg provides biographical details and a selected list of recordings.

NH

81

01

2000

023

034

James E

Potter

 

Author

First Nebraska’s Orphan Detachment and the Skirmish at Grand Prairie, 1864

While the Skirmish at Grand Prairie had no material effect upon the course of the war, more Nebraska troops were captured by the enemy in this skirmish and few of Nebraska’s Civil War soldiers suffered more hardship, fear, and frustration than Lieutenant Polock’s First Nebraska orphans in Arkansas and Missouri that summer and fall of 1864.

NH

81

01

2000

035

039

Richard E

Jensen

 

Editor

Editor’s Showcase: Love Letter from Pine Ridge

Henry Daum wrote to his sweetheart at Fort Robinson in 1890 while he was serving with the Eighth US Infantry at Pine Ridge Agency. He warned her not to believe what she might read in the papers about the Wounded Knee Massacre.

NH

81

01

2000

047

048

Jill

Koelling

 

Author

Revealing History: Another Look at the Solomon D Butcher Photographs

In 1998 the Nebraska State Historical Society began to generate digital images from the glass plate negatives of the famous Butcher photographs of homesteading on the Plains. The new digital images reveal details previously hidden in the shadowed areas of prints made from the negatives.

NH

81

02

2000

050

055

Jane A

Funderburk

 

Author

How Fashionable were Women Settlers in Custer County, Nebraska?: Maternity Wear on the Nebraska Frontier, 1886-1892

Solomon Butcher’s Custer County photographs include views of women settlers, even rare images of pregnant women. All the pioneer women pictured clearly made an effort to maintain a fashionable appearance.

NH

81

02

2000

056

066

Ludy T

Benjamin

Jr

Author

Platform Disaster: Harry Hollingworth and the Psychology of Public Speaking

Hollingworth, an experimental psychologist, used science to solve problems. An embarrassing failure as a public speaker at an important event early in his career led him to write a book on the psychology of audiences.

NH

81

02

2000

067

073

Mark

Smith

 

Author

Karl Stefan, WJAG, and the Congressional Campaign of 1934

The development of WJAG radio from a pioneer stage to a full service facility with a liberal schedule of local information and entertainment catapulted Karl Stefan to popularity and to Congress in 1934. Stefan’s victory is an early example of the power of electronic media exposure and its potential impact on the political process.

NH

81

02

2000

074

082

Gary E

Moulton

 

Author

Lewis and Clark on the Middle Missouri

Lewis and Clark’s exploration of the Missouri between Sioux City, Iowa, and Pickstown, South Dakota, involved not only the terrain but also the plants and animals of the region. The Corps of Discovery also made its first contact with Sioux Indians during that part of its expedition.

NH

81

03

2000

090

105

Anne

DeCorey

 

Author

Edgar Beecher Bronson, Nebraska’s “Ranchman”

The author affirms that Bronson told readers the stories they expected to hear about the Wild West. His tall tales loosely related to actual events always featured Bronson as a character.

NH

81

03

2000

106

115

Patricia C

Gaster

 

Author

From Brownville to Bryan: Journalist James D Calhoun in Nebraska, 1869-1894

James D Calhoun spent twenty-five years, from 1869 to 1894, in southeast Nebraska working as a newspaperman and laboring in Democratic Party politics. Calhoun could delight his friends and readers with wonderful anecdotes, sometimes blurring reality and fiction.

NH

81

03

2000

116

127

James E

Potter

 

Editor

I Thought it my Duty to Go: The Civil War Letters of Thomas Edwin Keen, First Nebraska Volunteer Infantry

Twenty-two-year-old Thomas Edwin Keen, a Pennsylvania native, joined up with a group of diverse soldiers from Nebraska to fight on the Union side of the Civil War. He left behind twenty-three letters he wrote to family members between 1861 and 1864, providing a vivid description of his experiences as a private in the First Nebraska Volunteer Infantry.

NH

81

04

2000

134

169

Tommy R

Thompson

 

Author

Wearin’ of the Green: The Irish and Saint Patrick’s Day in Omaha

Anti-Irish feeling in the mid-nineteenth century led Irish immigrants in Nebraska to celebrate St Patrick’s Day with parades, religious services, balls, and some rowdiness. By World War I most Americans had joined the celebration, happy to be considered Irish for a day.

NH

81

04

2000

170

178

Koelling

Jill Marie

 

Author

Editor’s Showcase: The Blizzard of the Century

 

NH

81

04

2000

185

185

Kent

Blaser

 

Author

Where is Nebraska, Anyway?

Blaser draws on historical, geographical, and literary sources for answers to the question “Where is Nebraska?” (Six other writers contribute their ideas in short articles that follow, and Blaser responds in a concluding article.)

NH

80

01

1999

003

014

Robert W

Richmond

 

Author

I Think I Know Where Nebraska Is

Richmond uses the terms West, Midwest, and Great Plains interchangeably to refer to Nebraska.

NH

80

01

1999

015

016

Susanne K

George

 

Author

Prairie State (The): Root-bound to Nebraska

Nebraska’s native grasses define the state, according to George. She traces attitudes toward the land in the works of Nebraska authors.

NH

80

01

1999

017

020

Fred

Thomas

 

Author

Nebraska: Midlands and Diversity

Thomas considers Nebraska a transitional area, the Midlands linking the Midwest and the Great Plains. The diversity of its landscapes, its population, and its occupational opportunities set Nebraska apart.

NH

80

01

1999

021

023

Phil

Roberts

 

Author

West of Time

Roberts sees two Nebraskas. Where the time zone changes, the traveler leaves the Midwest for the West.

NH

80

01

1999

024

025

Bradley H

Baltensperger

 

Author

Labels, Regions, and Reality

Baltensperger considers Nebraska a Midwestern state, first linked to Chicago and other cities by the railroads.

NH

80

01

1999

026

028

Michael

Farrell

 

Author

There is No Place Like Nebraska

Farrell describes his personal connections to Nebraska and concludes that the state is a collection of interrelated groups of people.

NH

80

01

1999

029

032

Kent

Blaser

 

Author

Closing Comments, but Not the Last Word

Blaser summarizes the common themes of a series of brief articles written in response to his earlier essay, “Where is Nebraska, Anyway?”

NH

80

01

1999

033

035

Lawrence E

Aivars G

Arjijs R

Murphy

Ronis

Liepins

 

Author

Author

Author

Karlis Ulmanis: From University of Nebraska Graduate to President of Latvia

Karlis Ulmanis studied and then taught briefly at the University of Nebraska as a Latvian refugee. As president of Latvia years later, he shared his enthusiasm for Nebraska traditions with citizens of his country.

NH

80

02

1999

046

054

Laura McKee

Hickman

 

Author

Thou Shalt Not Vote: Anti-Suffrage in Nebraska, 1914-1920

Nebraska was one of the last states west of the Mississippi to approve woman’s suffrage.  The men of the state opposed giving the vote to women primarily because of ethnic or religious tradition.  Fear that women would support prohibition swayed many men.  Even some women opposed woman suffrage, dreading the social changes that might result. 

NH

80

02

1999

055

065

Wendell W

Oderkirk

 

Author

“Peculiar and Valuable Service” (A): Early Nebraska Nurse Training Schools, 1888-1926

Early nurse training schools, created by hospitals, used haphazard curricula and exploited their students as a cheap work force. By 1940 the few remaining schools emphasized high professional standards.

NH

80

02

1999

066

079

Robert C

Pettit

 

Author

Editor’s Showcase: The Hay Burner Stove

 

NH

80

02

1999

088

091

David

Murphy

 

Author

Foreword: The Place of Time

 

NH

80

03

1999

094

094

R F

Diffendal

Jr

Author

Earth in Four Dimensions: Development of the Ideas of Geologic Time and History

Nebraska’s geologic history extends from rocks billions of years old buried beneath the surface to sediments accumulating today.

NH

80

03

1999

095

104

Janet L

Jeffries

 

Author

Spacing Time: The Time Ball at Doane College

The daily time ball descent at Doane College made it possible to synchronize local clocks to nationwide Standard Time. This was a sophisticated form of timekeeping in the nineteenth century.

NH

80

03

1999

105

108

Paul A

Olson

 

Author

Reading Space as Time in Great Plains Recollective Architecture

Space tells us about time. It demonstrates what time has done to the buildings of the past and shows what conceptions of time were important when the buildings were constructed.

NH

80

03

1999

109

122

Gene A

Thomsen

 

Author

Timing Space: Determining the Western Boundary of Nebraska

Oliver N Chaffee and his crew endured hardships during the survey of the western boundary of Nebraska. Despite those difficulties and the limitations of the surveying equipment of their day, they achieved remarkably accurate readings of time and distance.

NH

80

03

1999

123

128

David

Murphy

 

Author

Space, Time, and Spacetime

The long-held belief that space and time were independent entities has given way to a more realistic notion that the two are intertwined. The appearance and importance of any region tends to change over time. The spirit of an era both drives and reflects such changes in space.

NH

80

03

1999

129

140

Francis

Moul

 

Author

Biggest Partner (The): The Federal Government and Sioux County, Nebraska

The Federal government has invested significant resources in Sioux County since the treaties with the Lakota Sioux freed the land for Euro-American settlement. It has been the major partner in providing infrastructure funding for projects: large irrigation systems, small pipeline systems, relief aid, and restoration of the land. Federal farm commodity support programs, conservation programs, and other federal programs continue, sometimes with unexpected results

NH

80

04

1999

150

165

Oliver B

Pollak

 

Author

Fred Morrow Fling: A One-Hundred-Year Retrospective on Historical Methodology

Fling, who taught history at the University of Nebraska for more than forty years, led a drive to place better-qualified history teachers in high schools. He called for the introduction of a scientific historical method.

NH

80

04

1999

166

168

Mary Cochran

Grimes

 

Author

Adversity, Challenge, and Change: The Nebraska Board of Control During Governor Cochran’s Administration, 1935-1941

Nebraska’s penal, reform, and charitable institutions were all in need of restructuring in 1935. Governor Cochran appointed advocates of social welfare reform and long-term planning. He also applied for all available federal assistance.

NH

80

04

1999

169

177

Mary

Krugerud

 

Author

Dazzler’s Story

Dazzler, a Poland China hog from Leigh, Nebraska, held the unofficial title of World’s Largest Hog in 1928.

NH

80

04

1999

182

184

Karyn

Stansbery

 

Author

Law at the end of the Trail: Ogallala, 1873-1887 (The)

Ogallala’s fame as the wild and wooly “Cowboy Capital” rests on a few well-publicized incidents. Providing law enforcement at the end of the Texas longhorns’ trail usually involved no more than tracking down local rustlers and horse thieves.

NH

79

01

1998

002

013

Elizabeth

Raby

 

Author

“Yours for Political Housecleaning”: Maud E Nuquist, First Woman Candidate for Governor of Nebraska

Maud Nuquist was known only for her work with Women‟s Clubs before she became a candidate in the 1934 Democratic gubernatorial primary. Her platform called for professional, not political, control of state departments.

NH

79

01

1998

014

023

William E

Lass

 

Author

Nebraska City’s Steam Wagon

Promoter Joseph Brown brought the first self-propelled vehicle, a steam wagon, to Nebraska City in 1862. Although his machine broke down and had to be abandoned only a few miles west of town, it did inspire trail improvement in Otoe County and beyond.

NH

79

01

1998

024

033

Pollak

Oliver B

 

Author

Capitalism, Culture, and Philanthropy: Charles N and Nettie Fowler Dietz of Omaha, 1881-1939

The prosperous businesses of the Dietz family included lumber yards in Nebraska and a coal mining company in Wyoming. The couple traveled widely and accumulated large art and book collections. They generously supported Omaha institutions

NH

79

01

1998

034

043

 

 

 

 

Editor’s Showcase: Queer Case – Desertion of a Soldier Guard and Two Convicts

 

NH

79

01

1998

051

051

Mark

Smith

 

Author

Early Years of Broadcasting in Norfolk, Nebraska (The), 1922-1928

During the 1920s, Norfolk station WJAG developed from a bulletin service of the Norfolk Daily News to a broadcast station that dispensed a variety of information and entertainment, and from hobby status to a business dependent on advertising. Future Congressman Karl Stefan became the area’s first widely-known on-air personality. Of three Nebraska newspaper publishers who established radio stations in the early 1920s, only WJAG continued to broadcast beyond the 1920s, celebrating its 75th anniversary in 1997.

NH

79

02

1998

054

068

Andrea I

Faling

 

Author

A Lost Lady in Hollywood

Hollywood’s 1934 version of A Lost Lady disappointed Willa Cather so much that she prohibited further dramatization of her work. Only when copyrights expired after seventy-five years did producers gain access to her writings.

NH

79

02

1998

069

073

Dennis N

Mihelich

 

Author

Boom-Bust: Prince Hall Masonry in Nebraska during the 1920s

Prince Hall Masonry is an African American fraternal organization that arose because blacks were excluded from white Masonic lodges. During the 1920s Prince Hall Masonry in Nebraska experienced a brief boom, but by the middle of the decade a bust ensued. The 1924-25 industrial slump combined with the downturn in the agricultural sector curbed the influx of African American Americans to the state. At the onset of the Great Depression, Prince Hall Masonry was a weakened but viable and vital institution among the limited number of African Americans in Nebraska.

NH

79

02

1998

074

084

Kingsley M

Bray

 

Author

Crazy Horse and the End of the Great Sioux War

The surrender of Crazy Horse and the members of his village at the Red Cloud Agency in May 1877 marked the end of the Great Sioux War.  The author explores the influence of Lakota political organization and kinship networks on Crazy Horse’s decision to accept reservation life.

NH

79

03

1998

094

115

Joseph

Agonito

 

Author

Young Man Afraid of His Horses: The Reservation Years

Young Man Afraid of His Horses played an important role in the Lakota peoples’ struggle to maintain their traditional way of life. After the death of Crazy Horse,  Young Man Afraid sought ways for his people to adapt peacefully to the changing world of the reservation rather than trying to restore the grandeur of the old life through obstructionist politics.

NH

79

03

1998

116

132

Richard E

Jensen

 

Author

The Wright-Beauchampe Investigation and the Pawnee Threat of 1829

The Pawnee tribe actively resisted the US Army and the white Americans moving west in the early nineteenth century.  An outbreak of smallpox, increasing numbers of white invaders, and perpetual skirmishes with other tribes diminished the Pawnees’ strength until they were placed on a reservation in Nebraska in 1854.

NH

79

03

1998

133

143

Michael A

Amundson

 

Author

Portrait of a Small Town: The Photographic Diary of Neligh’s Emanuel Wolfe

Emanuel Wolfe, a dry goods merchant in Neligh, took photographs that document his changing world. From 1900 until 1930 his large-format camera recorded images of family members, neighbors, homes, businesses, and events.

NH

79

04

1998

150

161

John D

McDermott

 

Author

No Small Potatoes: Problems of Food and Health at Fort Laramie, 1849-1859

Fort Laramie’s officers knew that scurvy was a major source of illness and death among their soldiers. They were aware that fresh vegetables produced locally were needed, but they did not succeed in having them cultivated on the post.

NH

79

04

1998

162

170

Patricia C

Gaster

 

Author

Rosa Hudspeth and the Stuart Ledger, 1901-1907

Rosa Hudspeth (1864-1911) was a newspaper writer and reporter and then an editor of the Stuart Ledger [Nebraska] from 1901-1907. Her brief career at the Ledger is illustrative of the difficulties women faced in managing small businesses and dealing with employees, the public, and local politicians.

NH

79

04

1998

171

178

Michele

Fagan

 

Author

“Give ‘Till It Hurts:” Financing Memorial Stadium

Memorial Stadium was a major construction project requiring significant resources in the 1920s. Students, alumni, and state residents were strongly encouraged to contribute even though Nebraska was just then experiencing an economic depression.

NH

79

04

1998

179

191

Wallace C

Peterson

 

Author

Editor’s Showcase: Death in the Afternoon

Charles “Speed” Holman, an experienced stunt pilot, was preparing to roar past the grandstands upside down at Omaha’s first annual Air Races when his plane plunged to the ground.

NH

79

04

1998

210

211

Harlan

Jennings

 

Author

Grand Opera in Nebraska in the 1890s

The 1890s in Nebraska marked the beginning of a golden age of grand opera. Nearly all the major operatic organizations and leading artists of the time came to perform.

NH

78

01

1997

002

013

Lewis O

Saum

 

Author

Eugene Field and the “Hayes Saloon” in Omaha, An Episode of 1885

Chicago journalist Eugene Field asserted that former President Hayes owned property in Omaha that included a saloon. This accusation, which turned out to be true, was highly embarrassing for Hayes, a symbol of the temperance cause..

NH

78

01

1997

014

021

Margaret May Patton

Edward Arthur

Jill Marie

Gehrke

Gehrke

Koelling

 

Author

Photographer

Editor

A Thousand Mile Motor Trip through Western Nebraska, 1916

Maggie Gehrke kept a daily journal of entertaining road stories on trips that she took with her husband Edward. This account of an excursion to Ainsworth is an example of the Gehrkes’ quest for adventure and their teamwork in the face of mishaps on the road.

NH

78

01

1997

022

027

Dennis N

Mihelich

 

Author

World War I, the Great Migration, and the Formation of the Grand Bodies of Prince Hall Masonry

The focus and status of Prince Hall Masonry in Nebraska changed as World War I was ending.  The African-American fraternity began to provide community service and to seek to expand civil rights.  The Great Migration brought additional members into the state’s lodges and made it possible for them to form the independent Prince Hall Grand Lodge and Grand Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star of Nebraska.

NH

78

01

1997

028

039

Thomas R

Buecker

 

Author

“The Men Behaved Splendidly”: Guy V Henry’s Famous Cavalry Rides

Captain Guy V Henry commanded troops from Fort Robinson, Nebraska, on two winter marches, sixteen years apart: in 1874 and 1890.

NH

78

02

1997

054

063

David

Drummond

 

Author

“The Delusion” of John Morris: A Better Mouse Trap and its Makers

In 1876 Nebraskan John Morris patented the first design for a multi-catch mouse trap that enjoyed great commercial success. Its most innovative feature, widely copied, was a hinged outer door that allowed the trap to function repeatedly before it was emptied.

NH

78

02

1997

064

074

Patricia C

Gaster

 

Author

Bix in Nebraska: A L Bixby and the “Daily Drift”

A L “Doc” Bixby (1856-1934) was one of Nebraska’s best-known newspaper columnists and humorists. His forty-two years (1892-1934) on the staff of the Nebraska State Journal of Lincoln afforded him an informed view of Nebraska history from the days of William Jennings Bryan to those of FDR.

NH

78

02

1997

075

083

Edward R

Tyron

 

Author

Nebraska Connections to a Titanic Disaster

The April 15, 1912, tragedy of the “unsinkable” Titanic is re-visited in this article recounting the stories of the survivors and victims with Nebraska ties. Though Emil Brandeis is the most famous, many others such as “Titanic Carl” Johnson (who settled in Swedeburg, Nebraska) and Victor Halva (who later settled in Wahoo, Nebraska), are included.

NH

78

02

1997

084

092

Mary Cochran

Grimes

 

Author

Books for Nebraska: Roy and Aileen Cochran and the Nebraska Public Library Commission

Between 1935 and 1941, Democratic Governor Robert L “Roy” Cochran and his wife, Aileen Cochran, accomplished much: reestablishment of the Nebraska Library Commission, a tripling of its appropriations; new laws placing more attention on rural, western communities and regional libraries; and the establishment of bookmobiles to serve outlying areas.

NH

78

03

1997

102

109

Rudolph E

Umland

 

Author

The Federal Writers’ Project: A Nebraska Editor Remembers

Umland became Nebraska state editor of the WPA Federal Writers’ Project in 1936. Many of the Nebraska writers were inexperienced and their office was chaotic, but they produced state and city guide books as well as many booklets and pamphlets on Nebraska topics.

NH

78

03

1997

110

115

Joanna Cohan

Scherer

 

Author

A Preponderance of Evidence: The 1852 Omaha Indian Delegation Daguerreotypes

The author describes the research process that helped her to identify two Indian daguerreotypes. She studied details of clothing and accessories, previously identified photographs, newspapers, and a diary in order to name some of the Indians pictured and determine locations where such images might have been made.

NH

78

03

1997

116

121

Anne M

Oppegard

 

Author

For Posterity: Namesakes of Four University of Nebraska Buildings

University buildings commemorate the distinguished service of Chairman of the Department of Physical Education for Women Mabel Lee, Chancellor E A Andrews, Chancellor Edgar Burnett, and President of the Board of Governors Charles H Morrill.

NH

78

03

1997

122

133

Samuel

Sinner

 

Author

Famine in the Volga Basin, 1920-124, and the American Volga Relief Society Records

Volga Relief Society records, housed at the Nebraska State Historical Society, detail ways that German Russians in Lincoln assisted ethnic Germans in Russia in the 1920s. These American supporters sent clothing, food, and cash to the Volga Germans persecuted by the Bolsheviks and left to starve.

NH

78

03

1997

134

138

R Eli

Paul

 

Author

Foreword

Fort Robinson History Conference background remarks

NH

78

04

1997

150

150

Frank N

Schubert

 

Author

Ten Troopers: Buffalo Soldier Medal of Honor Men who served at Fort Robinson

Ten of the twenty-three buffalo soldiers who received the Medal of Honor for actions in frontier conflicts or the Cuban Campaign of 1898 served at Fort Robinson. These included Ninth cavalrymen Emanuel Stance, George Jordan, Thomas Shaw, Henry Johnson, Augustus Walley, Brent Woods, and John Denny, William O Wilson, William H Thompkins, and George H Wanton.

NH

78

04

1997

151

157

Mary L

Williams

 

Author

Ladies of the Regiment: Their Influence on the Frontier Army

Wives of officers assigned to western military posts helped to shape the environments within their garrisons. They made comfortable homes for their families and used their influence to refine frontier army life

NH

78

04

1997

158

164

John D

McDermott

 

Author

Were They Really Rogues? Desertion in the Nineteenth-Century U S Army

During the nineteenth century one of the most discussed and written about problems in the United States Army was that of desertion. Considered a crime in all armies, desertion was an act punishable by death. Attitudes toward desertion varied substantially during the century, and a history of these changes is included in this article.

NH

78

04

1997

165

174

James E

Potter

 

Author

“He…Regretted Having to Die That Way”: Firearms Accidents in the Frontier Army, 1806-1891

Firearms accidents were one of many hazards of service in the frontier army. Malfunctioning equipment caused some of the accidents, but most resulted from careless handling of weapons.

NH

78

04

1997

175

186

Jerome A

Greene

 

Editor

Chasing Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse: Two Fourteenth US Infantry Diaries of the Great Sioux War

This article contains diary entries relating to the experiences of both an officer and an enlisted man of the Fourteenth U S Infantry in the aftermath of the Rosebud and Little Bighorn encounters. The diaries of Frank Taylor, Lieutenant, Company I, and Private William Walter Jordan, Company C, provide insights into daily events during Crook’s exhausting late summer expedition through the Yellowstone-Powder River region to the Black Hills of Dakota.

NH

78

04

1997

187

201

Michael W

Schuyler

 

Author

1950s (The): A Retrospective View

America felt relatively tranquil in the 1950s. To those who were enjoying a newfound post-war prosperity it seemed that problems like discrimination, poverty, and racism would solve themselves.

NH

77

01

1996

002

011

William L

Hewitt

 

Author

“The Indian Who Never Got Home”: The Burial of Sergeant John R Rice

Sergeant John R Rice, Winnebago, Nebraska, died in the Korean War.  His interment in a private Sioux City, Iowa, cemetery was underway when an official there, learning that Rice was Native American, invoked a “Caucasians only” clause in the cemetery’s bylaws.  When President Harry Truman learned of the cemetery’s refusal to bury a war hero, he offered the family a plot at Arlington National Cemetery, where Rice was buried a few days later.

NH

77

01

1996

012

020

Phil

Roberts

 

Author

Scotts Bluff National Monument and the Coming of Television to the Nebraska Panhandle

When a broadcasting company sought to build a television tower on top of the Scotts Bluff National Monument in 1954, the National Park Service refused the request. Television did come to the area the following year, when the company accepted a site without historical significance or striking scenery.

NH

77

01

1996

021

029

 

 

 

 

Strategic Air Command Memorial Chapel (The)

Striking stained glass windows in the Offutt Air Force Base chapel memorialize those who participated in SAC missions during the cold war. Today the chapel serves US STRATCOM personnel of all faiths.

 

 Acknowledgements: Lt Col Thomas J Land, director of staff, 55th Wing, U S Air Force; Anthony Godfrey, president, U S West Research Inc

NH

77

01

1996

030

032

Melba

Carol

Scott

Ahlgren

 

Author

Author

Witness to an Atomic Test

In 1955 Melba Scott observed Operation Cue, an above-ground atomic test in the Nevada desert. In this 1995 interview Scott describes her Nevada experiences and her feelings 40 years later about the dangers of an atomic explosion.

NH

77

01

1996

033

044

William C

Pratt

 

Author

Change, Continuity, and Context in Nebraska History, 1940-1960

The years 1940-1960 brought modern life to Nebraska. That era marked by political conservatism and anti-Communism saw important changes including increased home construction, greater educational opportunity, and interstate highways.

NH

77

01

1996

045

054

Robert M

Utley

 

Author

Remarks at the Symposium “The Way West,” Lincoln, Nebraska

The Ric Burns documentary miniseries The Way West leads historians to ask two questions. How should we look on our frontier past? How should television portray the frontier heritage?

NH

77

02

1996

062

066

Kent

Blaser

 

Author

Something Old, Something New: Understanding the American West

New West scholars are exploring history from the perspective of our time. Their topics include multiculturalism, environmentalism, and gender issues.

NH

77

02

1996

067

077

John D

McDermott

 

Author

“We Had a Terribly Hard Time Letting Them Go”: The Battles of Mud Springs and Rush Creek

The engagements at Mud Springs and Rush Creek did not cause major setbacks to either the army or the Cheyennes and Sioux.  The army protected the emigrant trail and the transcontinental telegraph while the Indians continued to move toward the Powder River.  Fighting intensified in the aftermath of these battles.

NH

77

02

1996

078

088

Phillip G

Twitchell

 

Editor

Camp Robinson Letters of Angeline Johnson, 1876-1879

Angeline Johnson, wife of an army captain, wrote lively letters home to her family in Pennsylvania from Camp Robinson in 1876.  She described everyday life as well as major events including Indian surrenders at the end of the Great Sioux War, the death of Crazy Horse (which she witnessed), and the Cheyenne Outbreak.

NH

77

02

1996

089

095

Gail DeBuse

Potter

 

Author

The Crazy Horse Scalp Shirt

This article examines the construction of the “Crazy Horse Scalp Shirt” to determine that it was not worn by the famous Oglala Sioux warrior Crazy Horse, despite this attribution in 1906 when acquired by the Nebraska State Historical Society as part of the Bristol collection.

NH

77

02

1996

096

098

Paul L

Hedren

 

Author

Battlefields as Material Culture: A Case Study from the Great Sioux War

Whether they are well-known or largely forgotten, the battlefields of the Great Sioux War provide many examples of American military material culture.  Most of them are both accessible to the public and

intact.  Some sites have been relocated after many years by scholars or enthusiasts.  An appendix lists twenty-nine encounters of the Great Sioux War, 1876-1877.

NH

77

02

1996

099

107

Robert W

Cherny

 

Author

Introduction

Special Issue: William Jennings Bryan and His America

NH

77

03

04

1996

118

118

William E

Christensen

 

Editor

The Cross of Gold Reburnished: A Contemporary Account of the 1896 Democratic Convention

Reprint of Edgar Howard’s eyewitness account of the 1896 convention and Bryan’s “Cross of Gold” speech, originally published in The Papillion Times, July 16, 1896

NH

77

03

04

1996

119

123

Vachel

Lindsay

 

Author

Bryan, Bryan, Bryan, Bryan

Reprint of Lindsay’s poem, subtitled “The Campaign of Eighteen Ninety-Six, as Viewed at the Time by a Sixteen-Year-Old, etc.”

NH

77

03

04

1996

124

128

Rebecca

Edwards

 

Author

Popular Appeals in the Campaign of 1896

In 1896 Bryan broke with tradition and undertook a series of exhausting campaign tours to sell his ideas directly to the voters. Many political cartoons of the time reflected this new combination of business and politics.

NH

77

03

04

1996

129

139

Kenneth C

Wenzer

 

Author

Tolstoy and Bryan

Bryan visited Tolstoy, the symbol of moral conscience, in Russia in 1903. In Chautauqua lectures and writings the American reaffirmed throughout his life Tolstoy’s creed of love and service.

NH

77

03

04

1996

140

148

Julie

Greene

 

Author

The Making of Labor’s Democracy: William Jennings Bryan, the American Federation of Labor, and Progressive Era Politics

Special Issue: William Jennings Bryan and His America During the years 1896 to 1912, the Democratic Party evolved from a conservative organization standing for states’ rights and limited government to an effective instrument for political, social, and economic reform. The alliance between organized labor and William Jennings Bryan figures predominantly in this transition.

NH

77

03

04

1996

149

158

John E

Carter

 

Author

Postcard Politics: The 1908 Presidential Campaign

Large numbers of political postcards circulated during the 1908 Bryan/Taft campaign. Some featured authentic or altered photographs. Cartoons promoting or making fun of a candidate appeared on other cards.

NH

77

03

04

1996

159

166

Kendrick A

Clements

 

Author

Secretary of State William Jennings Bryan

Bryan’s foreign policy alternated between rash interventionism and timid isolationism. He proved to be too idealistic to serve successfully as secretary of state in a time of revolution and world war.

NH

77

03

04

1996

167

176

Stephen Jay

Gould

 

Author

William Jennings Bryan’s Last Campaign

Gould’s essay, originally published in 1987, suggests that Bryan viewed his battle against evolution as an extension of the populist thinking that had inspired his life’s work. Gould accepts Bryan’s sincerity even though he questions Bryan’s arguments.

NH

77

03

04

1996

177

183

Robert W

Cherny

 

Author

William Jennings Bryan and the Historians

Bryan, the most influential Democrat of his time, fascinates historians even though he never won a presidential election. Most recent scholars agree that he had a sincere confidence in the ability of the people to govern themselves.

NH

77

03

04

1996

184

193

W Raymond

Wood

 

Author

Fort Charles or “Mr Mackey’s Trading House

Maps and journal entries suggest that in 1795 James Mackey established a trading post on the Missouri River for Spanish traders from St. Louis. Archeologists have found no trace of the post, which was located near present-day Homer, Nebraska..

NH

76

01

1995

002

009

Dennis N

Mihelich

 

Author

Origins of the Prince Hall Mason Grand Lodge of Nebraska (The)

Prince Hall Masonry is an African American fraternal organization that arose because blacks were excluded from white Masonic lodges. This article presents an early history of black Masons in Nebraska, piecing together limited documentary evidence from the establishment of the first lodge in 1875 through the formation of the Prince Hall Mason Grand Lodge of Nebraska in 1919.

NH

76

01

1995

010

021

Andrea I

Paul

 

Author

Nebraska’s Home Movies: The Nebraska Exhibit at the 1904 World’s Fair

Nebraska produced some early educational films for the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis. Filmed sequences showing the state’s farmers harvesting crops and its cowboys riding bucking broncos played to large and enthusiastic crowds.

NH

76

01

1995

022

029

Oliver B

Pollak