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Quilts A to Z

  Quilts A to Z

Quilts E to H

Echo Quilting: A method of quilting where the stitches outline an existing motif or piece in the quilt.

English Paper Piecing: A method of hand piecing in which fabric shapes are basted over paper templates and whip stitched together along the fabric edges.


English Ivy

Alternate pattern names: Clover Blossom, Autumn Leaves, Broken Branch
Lodema Evelyn West Wilde
Possibly 1865 -1884
76" x 63"
Nebraska State Historical Society, Source: Mrs. B. B. Roberts,
7937-3

All we know about this quilt is that it was made by the donor's mother, Lodema Evelyn West Wilde. Lodema was born in Indiana in 1854, married Alfred Wilde, and died in 1884 in Jewell County, Kansas.


Evening Star

Luthera Samantha Sprague Whitney, Vermont
Circa 1865
Nebraska State Historical Society, Source: David D. Whitney,
6081-101

This Evening Star quilt was made by Luthera Samantha Sprague Whitney of Vermont and her sister. Luthera married Cyrus Hall Whitney, and their son David Day Whitney was born in Brookfield, Vermont, in 1878. David brought the quilt to Nebraska with him about 1916. David was a professor of zoology at the University of Nebraska from 1916 to 1948. The eight-point star is a basic and enduring design in the quilting tradition. There are numerous variations on this design, with even more numerous names to accompany them.

Fat Quarter: One yard of fabric folded in half lengthwise and then widthwise and cut along the seams, creating a rectangle approximately 18" x 22.


Feathered Star variation

Emma Lemke, possibly Nebraska
1850 -1900
Nebraska State Historical Society, Source: Mrs. H. Herman Smith,
8100-1

The eight-point star is a basic and enduring design in the quilting tradition. There are numerous variations on this design, many with unique pattern names. The Feathered Star variation emerged in the second quarter of the nineteenth century. Emma Lemke, the donor's grandmother, made this example in the late 1800s, possibly in Nebraska.

Finished Size: The measurement or dimensions of a completed block or quilt without seam allowances.


Flower Pot Variation

Kathrine Enevold Grunwald, Omaha, Nebraska
1930s
80" x 58"
Nebraska State Historical Society, Source: Berno Marie Anderson,
13046-4

Kathrine Enevold Grunwald, the maker of this quilt, was born in Germany in 1870 and immigrated to the U.S. in 1889 to live in Omaha with her sister. She married Bernhard Grunwald, who had emigrated from East Prussia about the same time she did. Kathrine and Bernhard lived in Omaha all their married life and had three children and one grandchild, Berno Marie Anderson, who inherited and donated this quilt. Kathrine was known for her handwork skills and excelled at tatting, needlepoint, and quilting.

Foundation Piecing: A method of assembling a quilt block by sewing pieces onto a foundation of muslin or other fabric. Some variations include foundation piecing on paper or newsprint.

Friendship Quilt: Similar to an Album Quilt, a quilt made as a group project for one member of the group, with each participant making and signing a block or more for the top. Fundraising quilts, where individuals paid a sum of money to have their name included on a quilt, developed from this trend and are often distinguishable in that they usually feature many more names.

Glazed Finish: A light resin coating applied to the outermost layers of the batting to prevent bearding. Also known as a bonded finish. Bearding occurs when batting fibers work their way out of the quilt through the holes produced from the quilting process.


Goose Tracks

Experience Hack Smith, Nebraska
1870-1881
63" x 57"
Nebraska State Historical Society, Source: Thurman Smith Estate,
7092-9

Experience Hack Smith, the donor's grandmother, made this quilt. She began work on it in Vermont, where she was born, and finished it in Nebraska, where she homesteaded. Experience entered the quilt in the first Valley County Fair, held at Ord in 1881. The family called this pattern Duck Paddle or Fanny's Fan.


Grandmother's Flower Garden

Pearl Aegerter, Randolph, Nebraska
1930s
83" x 81.5"
Nebraska State Historical Society, Source: John Aegerter,
11860-2

The Grandmother's Flower Garden-style quilt is one of the most popular within quilting circles. This labor-intensive and beautiful pattern grew in popularity in the 1920s and emerged from earlier hexagon patterns known simply as Mosaic or Honeycomb. Godey's Ladies Book published a hexagon pattern in 1835, and early patterns were generally one-patch hexagon repeats. In time, quilters arranged these hexagon shapes into patterns of their own liking, creating mosaic-like effects. By the twentieth century the Grandmother's Flower Garden design had emerged, featuring "flowers" surrounded by rows of single-colored hexagons to represent garden paths or hedges. Pearl Aegerter of Randolph, Nebraska, made this quilt sometime in the 1930s.

Grain: The lengthwise and crosswise threads of a woven fabric.


Grape Clusters

Maker Unknown, possibly made in Pennsylvania
Circa 1930
69" x 63"
International Quilt Study Center, Jonathan Holstein Collection, 2003.003.0363
Purchase made possible through James Foundation Acquisition Fund, partial gift of Jonathan Holstein,
2003.003.0363

This quilt illustrates the trend in twentieth-century appliqué towards more realism in designs. Many early appliqué quilters looked to nature for their influence and floral shapes and designs were prevalent. It was not until the late eighteenth to early nineteenth century, however, that these shapes began to look more and more like identifiable flowers and plants.

Griege: Refers to woven textiles as they come from the loom, before they are dyed or printed and sold as finished goods. Also spelled greige.

Hand Quilting: The method of quilting done by hand. Normally, a quilting pattern is applied to the quilt top using templates and chalk pencils. The quilt sandwich is then inserted into some type of frame or loop to hold the sandwich taut while hand quilting. Generally, running stitches are used, and thus the threads on the top are about the same length and distance apart as they appear on the bottom of the quilt.


Hole in the Barn Door

Alternate pattern names: Monkey Wrench, Double Wrench, Churn Dash
Maker unknown, possibly made in Ohio
Circa 1875 -1895
77" x 66"
International Quilt Study Center, Ardis and Robert James Collection,
1997.007.0166

Homespun Fabric: A loosely woven fabric, usually of wool or linen, hand-loomed from hand-spun yarns.


Horn of Plenty

Attributed to Josephine Justus, Trenton, Missouri
Circa 1925
91" x 81"
International Quilt Study Center, Ardis and Robert James Collection,
1997.007.0642

This quilt illustrates two trends in quilting that emerged in the early twentieth century: more naturalistic appliqué and a lighter color palette. Early appliqué quilters looked to nature for their influence as floral shapes and designs were prevalent. It was not until the late eighteenth to early nineteenth century, however, that these shapes began to look more and more like identifiable flowers and plants. Appliqué quilters, for numerous reasons including aesthetic trends and available fabrics, favored red and green color schemes. Technological advances throughout the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries led to abundant fabric choices and, in turn, abundant use of color and pattern in quilts.


Hourglass

Maker unknown, possibly made in Canton, Ohio
Circa 1925
84" x 72"
International Quilt Study Center, Ardis and Robert James Collection,
1997.007.0553

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Last updated 23 May 2007  

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